The DEA has created a new drug
Code for cannabis extracts, leading to some feather fluffing in the advocacy press.

The Federal Register notice explaining this is pretty clear so I’m not seeing where the alleged confusion lies.

The part responding to prior comment makes the situation with cannabidiol (CBD) very explicit.

One comment requested clarification of whether the new drug code will be applicable to cannabidiol (CBD), if it is not combined with cannabinols.

DEA response: For practical purposes, all extracts that contain CBD will also contain at least small amounts of other cannabinoids.1 However, if it were possible to produce from the cannabis plant an extract that contained only CBD and no other cannabinoids, such an extract would fall within the new drug code 7350. In view of this comment, the regulatory text accompanying new drug code 7350 has been modified slightly to make clear that it includes cannabis extracts that contain only one cannabinoid.

CBD has been on the Schedule for quite some time as far as I know. It is listed specifically on the application for a researcher license. You won’t be able to buy it from a legitimate scientific reagent company such as Sigma without a DEA license. Very hard to miss.

I am aware of some very dodgy stuff going on with CBD for the quack supplement industry. From what I can tell, some of these companies are importing pure CBD under cover of “industrial hemp”. Hemp is defined by lack of delta9-THC content, of course. Making “hemp” that contains high levels of the clearly Scheduled CBD a very gray area. It will be interesting to see if part of the outcome of this new extracts code will be invigorated prosecution of these CBD supplement companies.

If the lab head tells the trainees or techs that a specific experimental outcome* must be generated by them, this is scientific misconduct.

If the lab head says a specific experimental outcome is necessary to publish the paper, this may be very close to misconduct or it may be completely aboveboard, depending on context. The best context to set is a constant mantra that any outcome teaches us more about reality and that is the real goal.


*no we are not talking about assay validation and similar technical development stuff.

A report by CBS News reports on a 2015 paper:

Howard S. Kim, MD, John D. Anderson, MD, Omeed Saghafi, MD, Kennon J. Heard, MD, PhD, and Andrew A. Monte, MD Cyclic Vomiting Presentations Following Marijuana Liberalization in Colorado. Acad Emerg Med. 2015 Jun; 22(6): 694–699.
Published online 2015 Apr 22.
[pubmed

From the Abstract:


The authors reviewed 2,574 visits and identified 36 patients diagnosed with cyclic vomiting over 128 visits. The prevalence of cyclic vomiting visits increased from 41 per 113,262 ED visits to 87 per 125,095 ED visits after marijuana liberalization, corresponding to a prevalence ratio of 1.92 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.33 to 2.79). Patients with cyclic vomiting in the postliberalization period were more likely to have marijuana use documented than patients in the preliberalization period (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% CI = 1.44 to 9.00).

For background on the slow, Case Report driven appreciation that a chronic cyclical vomiting syndrome can be caused by cannabis use, see blog posts here, here, here.

The major takeaway message is that when physicians or patients are simply aware that there is this syndrome, diagnosis can be more rapid and a lot less expensive. Patients can, if they are able to stop smoking pot, find relief more quickly.

As far as the present report showing increasing rates in CO, well, this is interesting. Consistent with a specific causal relationship of cannabis use to this hyperemesis syndrome. But hard to disentangle growing awareness of the syndrome from growing incidence of it. We’ll just have to follow these relationships as more states legalize medical and recreational marijuana.

Additional coverage from Dirk Hansen.