Reviewer mindset 

March 22, 2016

I was just observing that I’d far rather my grants were reviewed by someone who had just received a new grant (or fundable score) than someone who had been denied a few times recently. 

It strikes me that this may not be universal logic.

Thoughts? 

 Is the disgruntled-applicant reviewer going to be sympathetic? Or will he do unto you as he has been done to?

Will the recently-awarded reviewer be in a generous mood? Or will she pull up the ladder? 

via comment from A Salty Scientist:

Gnosis:

When you search for papers on PubMed, it usually gives the results in chronological order so many new but irrelevant papers are on the top. When you search papers on Google Scholar, it usually gives results ranked by citations, so will miss the newest exciting finding. Students in my lab recently made a very simple but useful tool Gnosis. It ranks all the PubMed hits by (Impact Factor of the journal + Year), so you get the newest and most important papers first.

Emphasis added, as if I need to. You see, relevant and important papers are indexed by the journal impact factor. Of course.

Just remember this graph when you are being told about the service requirements of your job and how “good it will look to the P&T committee” if you say yes to the next demand on your time.

In fact, you know what? Just go ahead and print this out and slip it under your Chair’s door.

via:
Diversity and the Ivory Ceiling by
Joya Misra and Jennifer Lundquist at Inside Higher Ed.