NPR on the NIH Grant situation

September 10, 2014

In the event that you missed it, NPR has been running stories on the current situation with NIH-funded biomedical research in the US. These seem to be mostly the work of Richard Harris, so many thanks to him for telling these stories to the public. You will note that these are not issues new to this readership for the most part. The themes are familiar and, perhaps necessarily, latch onto one position and therefore lack breadth and dimension. Those familiar with my views on “the real problem” with respect to NIH funding will see many things I object to in terms of truthy sounding assertions that don’t hold water on examination. Still, I am positively delighted that this extensive series is being brought to the NPR audience.

Enjoy.

When Scientists Give Up

“When I was a very young scientist, I told myself I would only work on the hardest questions because those were the ones that were worth working on,” he says. “And it has been to my advantage and my detriment.”

Over the years, he has written a blizzard of grant proposals, but he couldn’t convince his peers that his edgy ideas were worth taking a risk on. So, as the last of his funding dried up, he quit his academic job.

“I shouldn’t be a grocer right now,” he says with a note of anger in his voice. “I should be training students. I should be doing deeper research. And I can’t. I don’t have an outlet for it.”

U.S. Science Suffering From Booms And Busts In Funding

“If I don’t get another NIH grant, say, within the next year, then I will have to let some people go in my lab. And that’s a fact,” Waterland says. “And there could be a point at which I’m not able to keep a lab.”

He notes that the hallway in his laboratory’s building is starting to feel like a ghost town as funding for his colleagues dries up. He misses the energy of that lost camaraderie.

“The only people who can survive in this environment are people who are absolutely passionate about what they’re doing and have the self-confidence and competitiveness to just go back again and again and just persistently apply for funding,” Waterland says.He has applied for eight grants and has been rejected time and again. He’s still hoping that his grant for the obesity research will get renewed — next year.

Built In Better Times, University Labs Now Lack Research Funding

PAULA STEPHAN: In many ways, the research university that’s evolved today is much like a shopping mall.

HARRIS: She says think of universities as mall owners and individual scientists as the shopkeepers. Scientists get research grants and then pay rent to the universities out of that money. When grant funding doubled between 1998 and 2003, construction cranes went up all over the country to build more lab space.

STEPHAN: Universities were exuberant. They thought that they could keep running this kind of scheme – where the NIH budget would keep going up, and they could keep hiring more people.

HARRIS: But that didn’t happen. After the NIH budget doubled, it stagnated. In fact it’s declined more than 20 percent when you take inflation into account.

STEPHAN: We greatly overbuilt the shopping malls.

By The Numbers: Search NIH Grant Data By Institution (support site for the pieces by Richard Harris)