NIH has just released a whole slew of fascinating statistical data about grants awarded from 1998 through 2007. This is a 150+ slide Powerpoint deck with all kinds of grant award breakdowns catagorized by award type, awardee’s career stage, awardee’s sex, and all sorts of other interesting stuff. There is lots to discuss, but one of the first things to hit me when I skimmed the deck was one particular dramatic sex difference.

Read the rest of this entry »

A recent article on Science Careers covers the Imposter Syndrome and how it affects scientists.

“Impostor syndrome” is the name given to the feelings that Abigail and many other young scientists describe: Their accomplishments are just luck or deceit, and they’re in over their heads. The key to getting past it, experts say, is making accurate, realistic assessments of your performance. Perhaps equally important: knowing you’re not alone.

You are most certainly not alone if you have the feeling that you are a professional impostor and are sure to be found out eventually, with great humiliation and shame leading to unceremonious ejection from your field. You are not alone. The question for today is whether we can, as professional communities, minimize the effects of Impostor Syndrome in hampering the productivity of scientists?

Read the rest of this entry »

A recent article on Science Careers covers the Imposter Syndrome and how it affects scientists.

“Impostor syndrome” is the name given to the feelings that Abigail and many other young scientists describe: Their accomplishments are just luck or deceit, and they’re in over their heads. The key to getting past it, experts say, is making accurate, realistic assessments of your performance. Perhaps equally important: knowing you’re not alone.

You are most certainly not alone if you have the feeling that you are a professional impostor and are sure to be found out eventually, with great humiliation and shame leading to unceremonious ejection from your field. You are not alone. The question for today is whether we can, as professional communities, minimize the effects of Impostor Syndrome in hampering the productivity of scientists?

Read the rest of this entry »

From cyclingnews.com we have the news that the organization which runs the Tour de France will not be inviting professional team Astana to compete this year.

The Astana team was given a resounding vote of no confidence on Wednesday when the Tour de France organiser, Amaury Sport Organisation, announced that the team would not be invited to any of the ASO’s events. This means its star, Alberto Contador, will not be able to defend his titles in either the Tour or the upcoming Paris-Nice.

Only three days until the start of the Epogen Amgen Tour of California and already 2008 is shaping up to be another Year O’ Doping Scandal in pro peloton. Big. Sigh.

Read the rest of this entry »

From cyclingnews.com we have the news that the organization which runs the Tour de France will not be inviting professional team Astana to compete this year.

The Astana team was given a resounding vote of no confidence on Wednesday when the Tour de France organiser, Amaury Sport Organisation, announced that the team would not be invited to any of the ASO’s events. This means its star, Alberto Contador, will not be able to defend his titles in either the Tour or the upcoming Paris-Nice.

Only three days until the start of the Epogen Amgen Tour of California and already 2008 is shaping up to be another Year O’ Doping Scandal in pro peloton. Big. Sigh.

Read the rest of this entry »

The pot legalization folks are at least as organized as the MDMA advocates in attacking any and all science findings which might counter their firmly held beliefs. In fact one might assume that holding one’s fundraiser at the Playboy Mansion trumps some aging ex-GratefulDead-spouse [no permanent link so this may disappear]. Agent (provocateur) PhysioProf put me on the latest scent of drug-abuse science denial. In this case from one Bruce Mirkin, communications director of the Marijuana Policy Project has a screed on the “Latest Anti-Pot Quack Science” up on Alternet. He’s ticked about:

Recent weeks have seen a rash of new studies of marijuana hitting the mass media, generating scary headlines like “Smoking Pot Rots Your Gums,” “Cannabis Bigger Cancer Risk Than Cigarettes” and “Pot Withdrawal Similar to Quitting Cigarettes. Most of this coverage can be boiled down to a fairly simple equation:
Flawed science + uncritical reporting = misinformation.

“Flawed” science? Flawed science? We’ll see about that after the jump.

Read the rest of this entry »

The pot legalization folks are at least as organized as the MDMA advocates in attacking any and all science findings which might counter their firmly held beliefs. In fact one might assume that holding one’s fundraiser at the Playboy Mansion trumps some aging ex-GratefulDead-spouse [no permanent link so this may disappear]. Agent (provocateur) PhysioProf put me on the latest scent of drug-abuse science denial. In this case from one Bruce Mirkin, communications director of the Marijuana Policy Project has a screed on the “Latest Anti-Pot Quack Science” up on Alternet. He’s ticked about:

Recent weeks have seen a rash of new studies of marijuana hitting the mass media, generating scary headlines like “Smoking Pot Rots Your Gums,” “Cannabis Bigger Cancer Risk Than Cigarettes” and “Pot Withdrawal Similar to Quitting Cigarettes. Most of this coverage can be boiled down to a fairly simple equation:
Flawed science + uncritical reporting = misinformation.

“Flawed” science? Flawed science? We’ll see about that after the jump.

Read the rest of this entry »

The overlordz are seeking input from you, DearReader. One lucky respondent to the survey will receive a doorprize of an iPod Nano just for playing.

Around here at SciBlogs, people who know what the heck they are talking about like Tara, Orac, revere and Abel Pharmboy usually handle the dissection of the anti-sciencenauts who insist on not vaccinating their children against measles and the consequences thereof. Today however a specific, if anonymous, set of anti-vaccine parents are pissing me off. MMR woo-nauts and me, after the jump.

Read the rest of this entry »

Don't Mentor Like Bob Knight

February 10, 2008

On Thursday, just-retired winningest-ever college basketball coach Bob Knight was interviewed on a popular radio sports show. He just quit, in the middle of the season, as coach of Texas Tech’s men’s basketball team, so that his assistant coach son could take over as head coach. Anyway, why he was being interviewed is not relevant here.
The important point is that Knight made some very emphatic remarks that reveal quite a bit about his style of mentoring players. It is a style that sucks. He was as successful as he was despite, and not because of, his mentoring style. Don’t mentor your trainees like Bob Knight.
(Streaming video and analysis are below the fold. The interesting parts start at about five minutes in; if you don’t want to watch I have summarized the relevant bits.)

Read the rest of this entry »

On Thursday, just-retired winningest-ever college basketball coach Bob Knight was interviewed on a popular radio sports show. He just quit, in the middle of the season, as coach of Texas Tech’s men’s basketball team, so that his assistant coach son could take over as head coach. Anyway, why he was being interviewed is not relevant here.
The important point is that Knight made some very emphatic remarks that reveal quite a bit about his style of mentoring players. It is a style that sucks. He was as successful as he was despite, and not because of, his mentoring style. Don’t mentor your trainees like Bob Knight.
(Streaming video and analysis are below the fold. The interesting parts start at about five minutes in; if you don’t want to watch I have summarized the relevant bits.)

Read the rest of this entry »

Welcome to Alice Pawley who joins ScienceWoman over at “On being a scientist and a woman“. ScienceWoman writes:

Alice Pawley is a first-year faculty member in engineering education at Purdue University, and she’ll bring a wonderful new dimension to the stories on the blog. Alice and I “met” on the ‘net and she has a great writing voice and both a scholarly and personal perspective on women in STEM fields.

Yea! More science faculty blogging!

Alice’s research and professional interests center on gender perspectives and theories in engineering.

Now that sounds like fun! Looking forward to her stuff.

First Anniversary

February 8, 2008

It was a year ago that YHN created the first DrugMonkey blog entry entitled “Mozart would have been dead for 7 years…” which started:

Biomedical research scientists in the US (and worldwide) are bright, highly educated and creative folks. Most are dedicated to the public good, undergoing years of low pay while fueling the greatest research apparatus ever built- the NIH-funded behemoth that is American health science. Yet they persist in various types of employment stress and uncertainty for years, with minimal confidence of ever attaining a “real job”.

Thanks for reading.

Jessica Palmer’s outstanding Bioephemera blog has just joined the Scienceblogs consortium, and it is a great addition. Jessica will be blogging on all sorts of cross-cutting science- and art-related topics. Bioephemera also has some regular commenters who will add to the diversity of perspectives here, including one who quipped about the move:

Ah … science people … (roll eyes) !

Seriously, it is going to be a lot of fun to have Bioephemera here, so please check it out!
And one last thing: Jessica is also an outstanding painter. A bunch of her amazing work is posted at the original Bioephemera site.

OMG! And now we find out Female Science Professor has talent for hilarious cartoons too? We are not worthy….


Click the picture for the rest…